You are now entering the world of my thoughts.

This blog is my diary of works in progress. The only way a writer can improve upon her skill is to practice, practice and practice some more. Here, in this place of quiet peace, I pen to paper my thoughts and creativity. Welcome to my world.

Copyright © 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 SN Taylor, All Rights Reserved

Monday, December 8, 2014

Wheels of Change Book giveaway

Wheels of Change


Racial intolerance, social change, and sweeping progress make 1908 Washington, D.C., a turbulent place to grow up in for 12-year-old Emily Soper.


For Emily, life in Papa’s carriage barn is magic, and she's more at home hearing the symphony of the blacksmith’s hammer than trying to conform to the proper expectations of young ladies. When Papa’s livelihood is threatened by racist neighbors and horsepower of a different sort, Emily faces changes she'd never imagined. Finding courage and resolve she didn't know she had, Emily strives to save Papa’s business, even if it means going all the way to the White House.


Age Range: 8 - 13 years
Grade Level: 2 - 8
Hardcover: 180 pages
Publisher: Creston Books (September 23, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 193954713X
ISBN-13: 978-1939547132
Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 7.8 inches

Notable Reviews
"Changes fomenting both locally and nationally during the final year of Theodore Roosevelt's presidency are seen through the eyes of feisty, bighearted Emily Soper, daughter of a carriage maker in Washington, D.C. Twelve-year-old Emily loves helping her father in his barn; she even dreams, in futility, of becoming a blacksmith like her father's beloved employee, Henry. She and her best friend, Charlie, ponder such things as gender roles, women's suffrage and 'horseless carriages.' She dutifully tries to become a lady even while working on a secret that uses her 'masculine" skills.' As the year progresses, Henry falls ill, and Emily and her family are subjected to the uncertainties of changing times as well as some nasty treatment from white supremacists. Resemblances to To Kill a Mockingbird are strong, especially during a tea party hosted by Emily's mother. A nice touch: Throughout much of the book, Papa teaches Emily—and vicariously, readers—new vocabulary words. The strength of the text lies in Jacobson's ability to evoke a different era and to endear readers to the protagonist. The prose is straightforward and well-researched, heavily peppered with historical references and containing enough action to keep readers' attention. Readers will empathize with Emily as she goes through her own changes, and they will applaud her heroism in more than one chapter." (author's note, photographs, recipes, bibliography, websites) (Historical fiction. 8-11)






Winter Candle
by Jeron Frame

When each family at the diverse Juniper Court apartment complex needs something to light up the dark of winter, the stumpy, lumpy candle provides a glow brighter than the fanciest taper, revealing the true spirit of each holiday it illuminates.

Age Range: 4 - 11 years
Grade Level: Preschool - 6
Hardcover: 28 pages
Publisher: Creston Books (November 11, 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1939547105
ISBN-13: 978-1939547101
Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 8 x 10.2 inches


Notable Reviews:

"Light symbolizes hope, and festivals incorporating light and candles are found in many cultures, especially during winter.Ashford uses a single candle to weave a story of intergenerational and multicultural friendship. On Thanksgiving, Nana Clover realizes that she doesn't have a candle for her table and asks the super for one. Later, another family doesn't have a special braided havdalah candle to mark the Jewish Sabbath's end and borrows the half-used candle from Nana Clover. A few days later, the Ericksons find that one of the candles on their Saint Lucia crown is broken. They ask the Danzigers, and the same little candle continues its trip. The African-American family in 5A celebrating Kwanzaa needs the candle next, because the baby has eaten one of the seven candles for the kinara. Finally, a winter storm causes a power outage, and Nasreen and Faruq, who have just moved in, are concerned that their father won't find the building. Their mom suggests borrowing a candle from their neighbors, and the stubby piece of wax lights their father's way. Soon, all the neighbors join in to welcome the new family. The richly textured paintings highlight the glow of the small candle; the family portraits, too, glow with warmth. An author's note provides a brief overv iew of each celebration. The story's acknowledged tidiness facilitates its reassuring theme of neighborly sharing and assistance and makes it easily adaptable to a wide variety of settings. (Picture book. 5-8)"


--Kirkus Reviews



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2 comments:

Mary Preston said...

I think my daughter would enjoy this & gain from it.

Ms Saba (aka Teacher007.5) said...

It really does sound like a great book doesn't it??? :)


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